IUCN SSC Mid-Atlantic Island Invertebrates Specialist Group

Species

BackStephanopachys brunneus (Wollaston, 1862)

Stephanopachys brunneus (Wollaston, 1862)

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Coleoptera
  • Family: Bostrichidae
NT Near Treatened
IUCN Red List Status:

Countries of Occurrence:
Spain - Canaries

Archipelago(s):
Canaries

Assessor/s:
Nardi, G. & Mico, E.

Reviewer/s:
Alexander, K. & Nieto, A.

Contributor/s:

Facilitators / Compilers/s:


Assessment Rationale:

European regional assessment: listed as Near Threatened because this species potentially has a small Area of Occupancy (< 500 km²) and it is monophagous and dependent on a threatened habitat type (indigenous pine forest reduced by cultivation and fire). Therefore there is a continuing decline in the area, extent and quality of the area the species occupies, thus making this species close to qualify for Vulnerable. However there is no data on the extent of fragmentation of the pine forest it occupies, and the Near Threatened category is more appropriate.

EU 27 regional assessment: listed as Near Threatened because this species potentially has a small Area of Occupancy (< 500 km²) and it is monophagous and dependent on a threatened habitat type (indigenous pine forest reduced by cultivation and fire). Therefore there is a continuing decline in the area, extent and quality of the area the species occupies, thus making this species close to qualify for Vulnerable. However there is no data on the extent of fragmentation of the pine forest it occupies, and the Near Threatened category is more appropriate

Geographic Range:

This species is only found in the Spanish archipelago of the Canary Islands in the Atlantic Ocean.

Regions:
Spain - Canaries
Extent of Occurrence (EOO):
(km2)
Area of Occupancy (AOO):
(km2)
Elevation Lower Limit:
(m)
Elevation Upper Limit:
(m)
Biogeographic Realms:
Paleartic
Presence:
Extant
Origin:
Endemic Canaries
Seasonality:
Resident

Population:

The species is known from the major islands Tenerife, La Palma, El Hierro and Gran Canaria (Consejería de Medio Ambiente y Ordenación Territorial). There is little information available on the abundance of this species. It probably is uncommon like other members of the genus (Zoological Museum Lund holds a few specimens only). Population trend is unknown.

Habitat and Ecology

This is an obligate saproxylic species. It occurs in Pinus canariensis forests, for example in the Pinar de Garafia reserve in La Palma (800 ha). Because all other members of Stephanopachys are associated with conifers (especially pines), the Canarian pine is likely to be the only host of the species. Larval development is likely to take place in dead bark.

Major Threat(s):

Indigenous pine forest are suffering reduction through cultivation and forest fires. Pine forest is commercially managed in the Canary Islands and the traditional management of dead wood is not likely to benefit this species.

Conservation Actions

The species is present in at least one protected area.